Posts Tagged ‘facebook’

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Facebook: your pact with the devil

March 18, 2012
Facebook bed

In bed with Facebook, image from Mashable http://on.mash.to/FPT7XZ

I’m as frustrated as everyone else at constantly shifting Facebook privacy settings, and have struggled to keep my posts, and my kids posts private like many others. It’s a difficult place to be at times when you’d like to keep a personal life separate from a professional identity. It’s particularly worrying when dealing with kids’ Facebook accounts, even though these are the ‘digital natives’ we hear so much about there’s very little awareness of future consequences of everything being available for all to see. I even keep an extra account open so I can check on the privacy setting of their accounts – how much do I really want a stranger to see about my kids? How much is

safe? The apparent default setting of “open to all” every time the feature set changes does not help matters and means that a war of attrition is constantly in progress against creeping privacy invasion. So much for ‘friendly Facebook’ eh?

It gets worse though. It seems that some organisations, including colleges and government agencies in the USA are demanding usernames and passwords for prospective student and employees facebook accounts Read the rest of this entry ?

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#12hrfashion: Salford & Melbourne Online Fashion Collaboration

October 13, 2011

Logo from the Salford & RMIT Fashion Facebook page

As I type this around 60 students at University of Salford and about the same number at RMIT in Melbourne, Australia are coming to the end of a 12 hour fashion design-and-make collaboration and putting the finishing touches to their garments. The collaboration came out of discussion at Salford’s Media, Digital Technology & the Creative Economy  Steering Group and was the brainchild of Bashir Aswat (Fashion, Art & Design School) and Marianne Patera (Computing, Science & Engineering) who drove the whole project from the start.

The fashion groups in Salford and Melbourne both sent sealed bags of materials to each other in advance of

Bashir at #12hrfashion

the event, students at the receiving end had no idea what they were being sent ahead of the start of the 12 hour marathon. All student groups were linked to matching groups at the other side of the world by social networks and mobile devices. Twitter, Facebook, Skype, Bambuser, Ustream have all been used so that students could communicate right through the process. At each end a big screen displayed a live video overview of activity at the other side of the world.

I was there for the first couple of hours at Salford and have been following online since then – the event has been amazing! The buzz in the room as preparations were made for the 9pm start was really infectious, excited students and staff distributing mystery parcels sent from Melbourne – many with friendly messages on from their counterparts in Australia.

@samrecordsmusic is carrying out an MSc project on user generated content and motivation, he’s covering this as a case study and was helping out with some of the tech on the night.

I was Read the rest of this entry ?

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Why I tweet and other stories

June 5, 2011

A recent post from Daniel Teller rang a bell as I’d been thinking about how, and why I use various social media networks over the last months. I had noticed the fact that some people use it simply to amass followers and so appear more popular and ‘cooler’ that their friends. I have kids and the glee with which they boast about number of ‘likes’ on a post and how many friends they have is hilarious at times. I had rather hoped that it was a kid thing rather than an activity for grown ups

Beyond being depressed by people’s childlike motivation though I was also struck by how much Daniel’s twitter habits, and apparently Facebook habits, differ from my own. The premise of his post is that the essential difference between the platforms is time; Twitter is now and a message from an hour ago is stale and worthless. At one point I started feeling a little hectored, “Twitter is a messaging protocol – not a content store”, “A tweet from yesterday is practically worthless”. Yes it’s not a content store, that’s absolutely true and it’s based on messaging BUT Read the rest of this entry ?

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